Internalized Oppression on Racism by Jabari Lyles Discussion

Internalized Oppression on Racism by Jabari Lyles Discussion

First, read the Pyke article and Cudd Then, view the second video from the link below; it is the one on internalized oppression, approximately 9 minutes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIP0lYrdirI&feature=youtu.be https://youtu.be/HF5K3J_Z8nk Finally, you will write the 2-3 page reflection paper. Pacific Sociological Association What is Internalized Racial Oppression and Why Don’t We Study it? Acknowledging Racism’s Hidden Injuries Author(s): Karen D. Pyke Source: Sociological Perspectives, Vol. 53, No. 4 (Winter 2010), pp. 551-572 Published by: University of California Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/sop.2010.53.4.551 . Accessed: 18/02/2015 17:01 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. . Sage Publications, Inc. and Pacific Sociological Association are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Sociological Perspectives. http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 158.103.0.1 on Wed, 18 Feb 2015 17:01:06 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions WHAT IS INTERNALIZED RACIAL OPPRESSION AND WHY DON’T WE STUDY IT? ACKNOWLEDGING RACISM’S HIDDEN INJURIES KAREN D. PYKE University of California–Riverside ABSTRACT: Despite sociology’s longstanding interest in inequality, the internalization of racial oppression among the racially subordinated and its contribution to the reproduction of racial inequality has been largely ignored, reflecting a taboo on the subject. Consequently, internalized racism remains one of the most neglected and misunderstood components of racism. In this article, the author argues that only by defying the taboo can sociology expose the hidden injuries of racism and the subtle mechanisms that sustain White privilege. After reviewing the concept and providing examples of the phenomenon, the author draws on critical social theory to examine reasons for the taboo, such as a theoretical fixation on resistance, a penchant for racial essentialism, and the limitations of an identity politics. The author concludes by offering a method for studying internalized racism and resistance concurrently within the matrix of intersecting forms of oppression. Keywords: internalized racism, White privilege, resistance, complicity, oppression, inequality, critical race theory It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consciousness, this sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity. —W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folks (1989 [1903]:3) When I grew up my parents would hate me hanging out with anyone Asian. I mean they would literally say, “Don’t hang out with them.” I guess they have a preconception of them as being gang members. I don’t know. I never really asked them. Maybe it was the way my parents influenced me because the whole time I was with anyone Asian I just felt uneasy. I can’t stand Vietnamese people or just Asians in general. —Author’s group interview with Vietnamese American males Over one hundred years have elapsed since W.E.B. Du Bois (1989 [1903]:3) described how White domination affects a “double consciousness” for the Black American Address correspondence to: Karen D. Pyke, Department of Sociology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 ; e-mail: karen.pyke@ucr.edu. Sociological Perspectives, Vol. 53, Issue 4, pp. 551–572, ISSN 0731-1214, electronic ISSN 1533-8673. © 2010 by Pacific Sociological Association. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press’s Rights and Permissions website, at http://www.ucpressjournals.com/reprintinfo.asp. DOI: 10.1525/sop.2010.53.4.551. SOP5304_06.indd 551 11/9/10 3:50:57 PM This content downloaded from 158.103.0.1 on Wed, 18 Feb 2015 17:01:06 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions 552 SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES Volume 53, Number 4, 2010 born into “a world which yields him no true self-consciousness, but only lets him see himself through the revelation of the other world.” Despite an enduring respect for Du Bois and his oft-cited allusion to internalized racial oppression, sociology has yet to devote sustained attention to the topic. In fact, Stuart Hall refers to internalized racism as one of the

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